Ken’s Antique Farm Equipment

Ken’s Antique Farm Equipment

    Portland Door Cutter Sleigh, (circa 1900) Cutters are considered light sleighs, usually pulled by one horse.  It is a distinctly American term that does not appear to have been used prior to 1800. The Cutter on display is a Portland style with two doors. Doors are unusual in Cutters and were a very late development, probably an influence of automobile designers. This beautifully restored Portland Door Cutter, (circa 1850-1900) featuring longitudinal leaf springs for comfort and leather door panels with pockets for storage, was manufactured by the Wisconsin Carriage Co in Janesville, Wisconsin.  The chromed rein rail and side rails, refinished woodwork and comfortable interior, preserve a mode of winter transportation popular in late 1800’s and early 1900’s America.  Acquired by Ken Nagel in the fall of 2016 from a friend who used it as a display, the restoration and refurbishment was carried out at Nagel Farms by Francisco Reynoso. Extensive research ensured that the restoration was accurate and authentic.  Experts in paint, leather, upholstery and wood craftmanship were engaged to work on each phase of the project. Established in 1885 the Lawrence Carriage Top Company, was a manufacturer of carriage tops, cushions, backs, and upholstery for buggies, wagons, and […]

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      Four Passenger Four Wheel Phaeton Carriage The Four Passenger Four Wheel Phaeton Carriage on display in Ken’s collection was acquired by Ken around 1976 from a restaurant owner in Plano, IL who used it as a lawn display in front of his restaurant.  At one time Ken had a driving horse that he used to pull the carriage.  It was great fun for the Nagel family to ride in the carriage in the Plano 4th of July parade dressed as characters from the TV show, The Little House on the Prairie. Little is known about the history of Ken’s carriage other than that it was manufactured in Ottawa IL by a builder who is no longer in business.  In 2013 Ken had it refurbished.  All the leather was redone. The wood and iron fittings were repainted in their original black and red to withstand the weather.  Ken’s Phaeton features solid axel running gear front and rear, sprung with a transverse leaf spring in the front and a longitudinal leaf spring in the rear to soften and stabilize the ride.    Well-padded leather covered seats tufted with contrasting red buttons adorn the interior and provide a soft and comfortable ride.  Fenders over […]

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        End Spring Square Box Buggy Ken acquired this End Spring Square Box Buggy from Frank Coffman, his neighbor. Frank had been using it as a show piece in his front yard. Frank bought the buggy from a party in Sheridan Ill. Ken had the buggy restored in 2013. The seats and folding top are new. The wood and metal fittings were reconditioned and refinished with oil based outdoor paint. Black leather button tufted cushions seat two. Solid axels front and rear are mounted to two transverse leaf springs front and rear for a comfortable if somewhat bouncy ride. Apparently, no one thought to dampen the springs with shock absorbers? The folding auto top served mostly to screen the sun as it provided little protection from rain or snow. The box is made of wood and has space for some cargo behind the passenger seat. Iron fittings and the frame for the folding top are painted black. The box is finished in a shade of rustic brown with cream colored accent decorations. The large spoke wheels are also finished in cream color with orange accented pin striping making for a very attractive appearance. The business top buggy was used to transport […]

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        1890’s John Deere High Wheel Box WagonTriumph Model with McCormick Seeder
        • Circa 1910 Mfg. Moline
        • Wagon
        • 1900

        John Deere Triumph Farm Wagon (circa 1900) with International Harvester Seed Spreader The John Deere Triumph Farm Wagon on display at Nagel Farms is a typical example of one of the 30,000 wagons that John Deere Co. was producing during their peak production years.  In 1919, power to pull these wagons (and other farm implements) came from the 26,000,000 draft horses that were stabled in the United States at the time.  Gradually the wagons and horses began to disappear from the landscape.  Having outlived their usefulness, wagons were often used as decorations, left to rot and rust in the back of farm lots or junked for their scrap value. Today these wagons are quite valuable.  In both original and restored condition, they are not only prized for their nostalgic connection to the rich farming heritage that made our country great and fueled its explosive growth, but are also valued by collectors and historical preservationists. Ken’s wagon was rescued from the ravages of time when he added it to his collection of farm equipment some years ago. There is no documented history of the wagon and the tailgate mounted International Harvester McCormick Deering Seed spreader prior to Ken’s ownership.  Research seems […]

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